Effects of Vascular Dementia on Cognition and Linguistic Communication: A Case Study Abstract: Abstract  Purpose: Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's's disease. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evolution and progression ... Article
Article  |   December 2009
Effects of Vascular Dementia on Cognition and Linguistic Communication: A Case Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nidhi Mahendra
    Department of Communicative Sciences & Disorders, California State University East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Nisha Engineer
    Department of Communicative Sciences & Disorders, California State University East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • © 2009 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   December 2009
Effects of Vascular Dementia on Cognition and Linguistic Communication: A Case Study
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2009, Vol. 19, 107-116. doi:10.1044/nnsld19.4.107
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2009, Vol. 19, 107-116. doi:10.1044/nnsld19.4.107
Abstract
Abstract:

Abstract  Purpose: Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's's disease. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evolution and progression of vascular dementia over two years and detail its effects on multiple measures of cognition and linguistic communication.

Abstract  Methods: Data from multiple sources (e.g., medical records, direct testing, staff reports, and client observations) has been integrated to provide a detailed report of the effects of vascular dementia on global cognitive status and on specific domains of attention, episodic and semantic memory, executive function, visuospatial ability, linguistic comprehension, and linguistic expression.

Abstract  Results and Conclusions: Vascular dementia affects multiple cognitive domains including language and communicative function. Clinical implications are presented for choice of tests and language tasks for evaluating the effects of vascular dementia on linguistic communication.

Acknowledgment
Preparation of this article was supported by ETAC Grant # 05-14644 awarded to the first author by the Alzheimer's's Association.
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