Aprosodia Secondary to Right Hemisphere Damage Purpose: This article introduces two types of prosody in human communication; describes right hemisphere contributions to prosody; describes prosodic deficits associated with right hemisphere damage; and discusses prevalence, quality of life, spontaneous recovery, and treatment of aprosodia. Method: Definitions of affective and linguistic prosody and aprosodia are provided. Results of ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2009
Aprosodia Secondary to Right Hemisphere Damage
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy D. Rodriguez
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Florida, VARRD, Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2009
Aprosodia Secondary to Right Hemisphere Damage
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2009, Vol. 19, 71-76. doi:10.1044/nnsld19.3.71
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2009, Vol. 19, 71-76. doi:10.1044/nnsld19.3.71
Abstract

Purpose: This article introduces two types of prosody in human communication; describes right hemisphere contributions to prosody; describes prosodic deficits associated with right hemisphere damage; and discusses prevalence, quality of life, spontaneous recovery, and treatment of aprosodia.

Method: Definitions of affective and linguistic prosody and aprosodia are provided. Results of lesion studies and neuroimaging studies are reviewed to inform the reader of the importance of the right hemisphere in prosody expression and comprehension, as well as to describe patterns of prosodic deficits in individuals with right hemisphere damage.

Results and Conclusions: There is a large body of evidence supporting the role of the right hemisphere in affective prosody comprehension and production. Specifically, frontal brain regions and the basal ganglia are associated with aprosodia, suggesting there may be an underlying motor impairment. Because aprosodia is enduring and can impact quality of life, it is important to gain a better understanding of this disorder so that clinicians can accurately diagnose prosodic deficits and provide informed treatment.

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