CE Introduction Persons living with severe aphasia present with communication deficits that challenge the ability to participate in life's activities. They struggle to communicate simple messages, and the ability to hold a meaningful conversation is all but lost. These changes make it difficult to maintain personal identities and relationships with family ... SIG News
SIG News  |   April 01, 2009
CE Introduction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael de Riesthal
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute, Nashville, TN
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   April 01, 2009
CE Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2009, Vol. 19, 5-6. doi:10.1044/nnsld19.1.5
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2009, Vol. 19, 5-6. doi:10.1044/nnsld19.1.5
Persons living with severe aphasia present with communication deficits that challenge the ability to participate in life's activities. They struggle to communicate simple messages, and the ability to hold a meaningful conversation is all but lost. These changes make it difficult to maintain personal identities and relationships with family members and within the community. For a speech-language pathologist (SLP), working with an individual with severe aphasia can be frustrating, because it is difficult to assess adequately the individual's communicative strengths and weaknesses, facilitate the desired changes in communication, document the improvement in communication skills that does occur, and promote understanding and acceptance of the individual's condition by his or her loved ones. These frustrations can lead to the conclusion that nothing more can be done to help these individuals. The current issue of Perspectives addresses these issues by presenting perspectives on managing the communication, social, and emotional needs of individuals with severe aphasia and their families that look beyond the traditional approaches in the field of speech-language pathology. The articles combine the three elements of evidence-based practice (Sackett, Straus, Richardson, Rosenberg, & Haynes, 2000): best evidence from the aphasia treatment literature, clinical expertise, and observation of the role that patient values play in recovery.
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