Cognitive and Communicative Consequences of Cardiovascular Disease Purpose: A growing literature has documented that cardiovascular disease (CVD), even prior to causing strokes and other neurological disorders, can negatively affect cognitive and communicative functioning in children and adults. The purpose of this paper is to summarize current findings pertaining to the clinical management of cognitive and communicative changes ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2008
Cognitive and Communicative Consequences of Cardiovascular Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura L. Murray
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2008
Cognitive and Communicative Consequences of Cardiovascular Disease
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2008, Vol. 18, 152-161. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.4.152
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2008, Vol. 18, 152-161. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.4.152
Abstract

Purpose: A growing literature has documented that cardiovascular disease (CVD), even prior to causing strokes and other neurological disorders, can negatively affect cognitive and communicative functioning in children and adults. The purpose of this paper is to summarize current findings pertaining to the clinical management of cognitive and communicative changes associated with CVD by (a) reviewing common conditions, risk factors, and cognitive-communicative symptoms associated with CVD and (b) identifying strategies for assessing and treating the cognitive-communicative consequences of CVD.

Method: The current empirical literature was critically reviewed to provide a brief overview of CVD conditions, risk factors, and occurrence statistics, followed by a summary of cognitive-communicative changes associated with CVD and management techniques that speech-language pathologists might utilize with this patient population.

Results and Conclusions: Given the burgeoning prevalence of CVD, there is growing need for clinical understanding of CVD-related cognitive-communicative changes and the procedures appropriate for identifying and managing these changes in the diverse CVD population. Several lines of investigation, however, must be pursued to assure that the diagnostic and management suggestions provided in the current review are appropriate and to delineate further the role speech-language pathology can play in maximizing functional outcomes in individuals with CVD.

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