Brain Tumors Frequently Encountered by Speech-Language Pathologists: A Review and Tutorial Purpose: As diagnostic and treatment techniques for brain tumors improve, the prevalence of patients diagnosed and living with the neurologic consequences of brain tumors is increasing. The purpose of this paper is to outline pertinent information regarding brain tumors to facilitate rehabilitation efforts by speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Method: The current ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2008
Brain Tumors Frequently Encountered by Speech-Language Pathologists: A Review and Tutorial
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jamie F. Mayer
    Department of Allied Health and Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2008
Brain Tumors Frequently Encountered by Speech-Language Pathologists: A Review and Tutorial
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2008, Vol. 18, 129-136. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.4.129
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2008, Vol. 18, 129-136. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.4.129
Abstract

Purpose: As diagnostic and treatment techniques for brain tumors improve, the prevalence of patients diagnosed and living with the neurologic consequences of brain tumors is increasing. The purpose of this paper is to outline pertinent information regarding brain tumors to facilitate rehabilitation efforts by speech-language pathologists (SLPs).

Method: The current empirical literature was critically reviewed to provide a synopsis of brain tumor occurrence rates, tumor classification methods, pediatric and geriatric issues, and basic medical and rehabilitative treatment information. Due to the large literature base pertaining to many very rare brain tumors, only those tumors likely to be encountered most frequently by SLPs are highlighted.

Results and Conclusions: Speech, language, cognitive, and swallowing problems are common brain tumor sequelae. Patients diagnosed with brain tumors can and do benefit from rehabilitative services addressing these deficits. SLPs should have a working knowledge of brain tumors to facilitate and maximize rehabilitation-related diagnostic and treatment decisions for this patient population.

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