Benefits of Physical Fitness Training in Healthy Aging and Neurogenic Patient Populations Purpose: In recent years, research has identified a positive connection between physical fitness and exercise, and cognitive performance in healthy aging (e.g., Colcombe & Kramer, 2003) as well as a number of patient populations (e.g., Mostert & Kesselring, 2002). To increase awareness of the benefits of exercise on cognitive and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2008
Benefits of Physical Fitness Training in Healthy Aging and Neurogenic Patient Populations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Lorenzen
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
  • Laura L. Murray
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2008
Benefits of Physical Fitness Training in Healthy Aging and Neurogenic Patient Populations
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2008, Vol. 18, 99-106. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.3.99
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2008, Vol. 18, 99-106. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.3.99
Abstract

Purpose: In recent years, research has identified a positive connection between physical fitness and exercise, and cognitive performance in healthy aging (e.g., Colcombe & Kramer, 2003) as well as a number of patient populations (e.g., Mostert & Kesselring, 2002). To increase awareness of the benefits of exercise on cognitive and communicative health, this paper reviews the literature pertaining to the cognitive effects of exercise in healthy individuals, as well as preliminary findings regarding the role of exercise in disordered populations including those with stroke, dementia, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. It presents a treatment program combining low-intensity fitness training with speech-language therapy that was developed for an individual with traumatic brain injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and poor physical fitness.

Method: A review of the literature was conducted to summarize and synthesize previously published research in the area of exercise and cognition in healthy and patient populations.

Results and Conclusions: There is a growing understanding of the relationship between exercise and cognition in both healthy and aging patient populations. Research with various patient populations reveals positive outcomes and suggests the need to further this line of research in individuals with neurogenic cognitive-communicative disorders.

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