Acupuncture as a Treatment Technique for Aphasia and Cognitive Impairments Purpose: In response to the growing interest and use of acupuncture by Americans who are searching for effective treatments of aphasia and cognitive impairments, this paper serves to (a) briefly explain the technique of acupuncture, (b) describe its biologic mechanisms, and (c) summarize studies investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture in ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2008
Acupuncture as a Treatment Technique for Aphasia and Cognitive Impairments
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jacqueline Laures-Gore
    Communication Disorders Program, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Rebecca Shisler Marshall
    Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2008
Acupuncture as a Treatment Technique for Aphasia and Cognitive Impairments
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2008, Vol. 18, 107-113. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.3.107
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2008, Vol. 18, 107-113. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.3.107
Abstract

Purpose: In response to the growing interest and use of acupuncture by Americans who are searching for effective treatments of aphasia and cognitive impairments, this paper serves to (a) briefly explain the technique of acupuncture, (b) describe its biologic mechanisms, and (c) summarize studies investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating cognitive impairment associated with vascular dementia and stroke-related language impairments.

Methods: Published reports of the use and effectiveness of acupuncture in treating cognitive impairments related to vascular dementia and aphasia related to stroke are reviewed and reported.

Results and Conclusions: Rigorously designed studies investigating acupuncture and vascular neuropathologies are too few in number to produce any definite conclusions about the efficacy of this technique in treating aphasia related to stroke or cognitive impairments related to vascular dementia. Although there is some empirical evidence indicating that acupuncture may be a valuable adjunct to conventional therapies, speech-language pathologists should remain cautious of acupuncture's promise until further, well-designed studies are conducted.

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