Translation Research for the Rehabilitation of Left Spatial Neglect and Associated Disorders of Attention in Stroke Patients The syndrome of unilateral neglect, typified by a lateralized attention bias and neglect of contralateral space, is an important cause of morbidity and disability after a stroke. In this review, we discuss the challenges that face researchers attempting to elucidate the mechanisms and effectiveness of rehabilitation treatments. The neglect syndrome ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2008
Translation Research for the Rehabilitation of Left Spatial Neglect and Associated Disorders of Attention in Stroke Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nkiruka Arene
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Baltimore, MD
  • Argye E. Hillis
    Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Baltimore, MD
    Department of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Cognitive Science, Baltimore, MD
Article Information
Special Populations / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2008
Translation Research for the Rehabilitation of Left Spatial Neglect and Associated Disorders of Attention in Stroke Patients
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2008, Vol. 18, 55-65. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.2.55
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2008, Vol. 18, 55-65. doi:10.1044/nnsld18.2.55
Abstract

The syndrome of unilateral neglect, typified by a lateralized attention bias and neglect of contralateral space, is an important cause of morbidity and disability after a stroke. In this review, we discuss the challenges that face researchers attempting to elucidate the mechanisms and effectiveness of rehabilitation treatments. The neglect syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder, and it is not clear which of its symptoms cause ongoing disability. We review current methods of neglect assessment and propose logical approaches to selecting treatments, while acknowledging that further study is still needed before some of these approaches can be translated into routine clinical use. We conclude with systems-level suggestions for hypothesis development that would hopefully form a sound theoretical basis for future approaches to the assessment and treatment of neglect.

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