Reliability of the Conversational Interaction Coding Form When Applied to Natural Conversation of Individuals With Aphasia Purpose: Development of valid and reliable outcome tools to document social approaches to aphasia therapy and to determine best practice is imperative. The aim of this study is to determine whether the Conversational Interaction Coding Form (CICF; Pimentel & Algeo, 2009) can be applied reliably to the natural conversation of ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2010
Reliability of the Conversational Interaction Coding Form When Applied to Natural Conversation of Individuals With Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ashley Pozzolo Coote
    Sturgeon School DivisionMorinville, AB, Canada
  • Jane Pimentel
    Eastern Washington University, Spokane, WA
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2010
Reliability of the Conversational Interaction Coding Form When Applied to Natural Conversation of Individuals With Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2010, Vol. 20, 125-135. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.4.125
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2010, Vol. 20, 125-135. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.4.125

Purpose: Development of valid and reliable outcome tools to document social approaches to aphasia therapy and to determine best practice is imperative. The aim of this study is to determine whether the Conversational Interaction Coding Form (CICF; Pimentel & Algeo, 2009) can be applied reliably to the natural conversation of individuals with aphasia in a group setting.

Method: Eleven graduate students participated in this study. During a 90-minute training session, participants reviewed and practiced coding with the CICF. Then participants independently completed the CICF using video recordings of individuals with non-fluent and fluent aphasia participating in an aphasia group. Interobserver reliability was computed using matrices representative of the point-to-point agreement or disagreement between each participant's coding and the authors' coding for each measure. Interobserver reliability was defined as 80% or better agreement for each measure.

Results: On the whole, the CICF was not applied reliably to the natural conversation of individuals with aphasia in a group setting.

Conclusion: In an extensive review of the turns that had high disagreement across participants, the poor reliability was attributed to inadequate rules and definitions and inexperienced coders. Further research is needed to improve the reliability of this potentially useful clinical tool.

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