CE Introduction This issue of Perspectives focuses on assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with neurologic communication disorders. Children and adolescents present with unique challenges compared with adults in that their communication skills are still emerging according to predicted developmental milestones for speech and language. These individuals also are typically ... SIG News
SIG News  |   April 01, 2011
CE Introduction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Glenn Paustian
    The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   April 01, 2011
CE Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2011, Vol. 21, 4-5. doi:10.1044/nnsld21.1.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2011, Vol. 21, 4-5. doi:10.1044/nnsld21.1.4
This issue of Perspectives focuses on assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with neurologic communication disorders. Children and adolescents present with unique challenges compared with adults in that their communication skills are still emerging according to predicted developmental milestones for speech and language. These individuals also are typically engaged in new learning activities within the school setting. The pediatric and adolescent populations span birth through college years. While there are many topics to be explored in these populations, the articles selected for this issue discuss three different aspects of neurological communication disorders.
The first article explores one center's approach to the assessment and treatment of the minimally conscious state (MCS). The diagnosis of MCS is a relatively recent diagnosis within brain injury treatment. While literature exists regarding speech and language assessment and treatment of adults in the MCS, there is a paucity of literature about treatment of children and adolescents with this diagnosis. These authors offer their approach to working with MCS children and adolescents. The second article discusses the enigma of apraxia of speech (AOS) in children and adolescents. In contrast to the MCS, AOS has been well researched and documented, though the research has yielded a conflicting array of assessment tools and treatment strategies without rendering an agreed-upon best practice. This author uses both an historical review of literature regarding AOS, as well as the application of more recent neuroscience literature, and work with adult neurological and neuroscience models to establish a more unified approach towards AOS in children and adolescents. The final article addresses traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children discussing neurocognitive stall. Specifically, neurocognitive stall is defined as a gap, delay, or inability to achieve neurocognitive, social, and educational functioning after TBI. Again there is a unique presentation for the pediatric and adolescent population in that language, cognition, and social development continue to emerge in this developmental period. Addressed are interventions to enhance higher order cognitive skills and learning efficiency both within a rehabilitation and a school setting.
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