AAC and Severe Aphasia—Enhancing Communication Across the Continuum of Recovery Traditional aphasia treatment focuses on improving the disability level of people with aphasia, for example, assisting them to speak more effectively, comprehend more fully, or write with fewer errors. Many reports show that stimulation-type aphasia therapy works—that people with aphasia do indeed become better speakers or listeners (Holland, Fromm, ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
AAC and Severe Aphasia—Enhancing Communication Across the Continuum of Recovery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn L. Garrett
    Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Joanne P. Lasker
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
AAC and Severe Aphasia—Enhancing Communication Across the Continuum of Recovery
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2007, Vol. 17, 6-15. doi:10.1044/nnsld17.3.6
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2007, Vol. 17, 6-15. doi:10.1044/nnsld17.3.6
Traditional aphasia treatment focuses on improving the disability level of people with aphasia, for example, assisting them to speak more effectively, comprehend more fully, or write with fewer errors. Many reports show that stimulation-type aphasia therapy works—that people with aphasia do indeed become better speakers or listeners (Holland, Fromm, DeRuyter, & Stein, 1996; Wertz et al., 1981). However, other literature suggests that some individuals with aphasia, in particular severe aphasia, never recover enough from their disabilities to become functional, competent communicators unless alternate intervention models are introduced (Fox & Fried-Oken, 1996; Holland, 1998; Poeck, Huber, & Willmes, 1989).
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