Current Directions in Treatment for Apraxia of Speech: Principles of Motor Learning Current research in apraxia of speech (AOS) strongly supports its conceptualization as a disorder of motor control (e.g., Ballard, Grainer, & Robin, 2000; Ballard & Robin, 2007, for review). Recently, speech-language pathologists have become increasingly interested in examining the contributions that theories of motor control and learning, derived largely ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Current Directions in Treatment for Apraxia of Speech: Principles of Motor Learning
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shannon N. Austermann Hula
    San Diego State University and University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Language and Communicative Disorders and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Current Directions in Treatment for Apraxia of Speech: Principles of Motor Learning
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2007, Vol. 17, 3-6. doi:10.1044/nnsld17.3.3
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2007, Vol. 17, 3-6. doi:10.1044/nnsld17.3.3
Current research in apraxia of speech (AOS) strongly supports its conceptualization as a disorder of motor control (e.g., Ballard, Grainer, & Robin, 2000; Ballard & Robin, 2007, for review). Recently, speech-language pathologists have become increasingly interested in examining the contributions that theories of motor control and learning, derived largely from the study of nonspeech motor skills, can make to the clinical management of motor speech disorders such as AOS. The purpose of this article is to introduce principles that have emerged from investigations of general motor learning and summarize the emerging evidence concerning their application to AOS treatment that has accumulated since the last time an article was published in Perspectives on this topic (Ballard, 2001).
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