The Evidence-Based Practice and Practice-Based Evidence Nexus The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has become associated with an increasing awareness of the need for practice-based evidence (PBE; Horn, DeJong, Ryser, Veazie, & Teraoka, 2005). Margison et al. (2000) define “practice-based evidence” as a procedure for “gathering good-quality data from routine practice” (p. 123). Systematic reviews of the ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2007
The Evidence-Based Practice and Practice-Based Evidence Nexus
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie L. Wambaugh
    VA Salt Lake City Healthcare System and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2007
The Evidence-Based Practice and Practice-Based Evidence Nexus
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2007, Vol. 17, 14-18. doi:10.1044/nnsld17.1.14
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2007, Vol. 17, 14-18. doi:10.1044/nnsld17.1.14
The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has become associated with an increasing awareness of the need for practice-based evidence (PBE; Horn, DeJong, Ryser, Veazie, & Teraoka, 2005). Margison et al. (2000) define “practice-based evidence” as a procedure for “gathering good-quality data from routine practice” (p. 123). Systematic reviews of the literature across numerous health-care disciplines consistently have revealed inadequacies in the quality of the existing evidence, which undermines the development of specific management recommendations (Tunis, Stryer, & Clancy, 2003). This has certainly been the case with neurogenic communication disorders (e.g., Deane, Whurr, Playford, Ben-Shlomo, & Clarke, 2001; Greener, Enderby, & Whurr, 1999; Hanson, Yorkston, & Beukelman, 2004; Kim et al., 2006; Sellars, Hughes, & Langhorne, 2005; Turkstra et al., 2005; Wambaugh, Duffy, McNeil, Robin, & Rogers, 2006; West, Hesketh, Vail, & Bowen, 2005; Yorkston, Spencer, & Duffy, 2003). The insufficiency of supporting evidence for management strategies, in terms of both quality and quantity highlights the responsibility of the clinician for making informed decisions in patient care. Hopper (this issue) discusses strategies for making clinical decisions when research evidence is lacking, including advocating for more research. This article puts forth the additional suggestion that clinicians go a step further and become active participants in the collection of PBE. The rationale for the need for PBE will be discussed further and a brief description of methods for collecting such evidence will be presented.
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