Finding Time, Finding Evidence and Making Decisions: The Challenges of Evidence-Based Practice Clinical decisions are never made with absolute certainty because of the complex interaction between the client, the disorder, and the clinician. However, clinicians can reduce uncertainty in diagnosis and treatment by employing evidence-based practice (EBP). The EBP movement began in medicine and extended to other health-related professions in the ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2007
Finding Time, Finding Evidence and Making Decisions: The Challenges of Evidence-Based Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tammy Hopper
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta Canada
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2007
Finding Time, Finding Evidence and Making Decisions: The Challenges of Evidence-Based Practice
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2007, Vol. 17, 11-14. doi:10.1044/nnsld17.1.11
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2007, Vol. 17, 11-14. doi:10.1044/nnsld17.1.11
Clinical decisions are never made with absolute certainty because of the complex interaction between the client, the disorder, and the clinician. However, clinicians can reduce uncertainty in diagnosis and treatment by employing evidence-based practice (EBP). The EBP movement began in medicine and extended to other health-related professions in the 1990s after seminal work on the topic by several scholars, including Dr. David Sackett. In their well-known definition, Sackett, Rosenberg, Gray, Haynes, and Richardson (1996) describe EBP as “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients&[it] means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research” (p. 71). Whereas the EBP model is widely accepted across health and rehabilitation disciplines, implementation of the model in practice can be challenging when clinicians cannot access evidence or when it seems that evidence does not exist to support specific practices. Consider the following scenarios.
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