Educating and Supporting Individuals With Aphasia and Their Families Speech-language pathologists recognize the importance of educating and supporting individuals with aphasia (IwA) and their family members as essential components of a thoughtful and thorough communication treatment program (Webster & Newhoff,1981).Treatment of persons with aphasia is enhanced when family members receive information, support, and communication training (Holland & Fridriksson, ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2006
Educating and Supporting Individuals With Aphasia and Their Families
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra Glista
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2006
Educating and Supporting Individuals With Aphasia and Their Families
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2006, Vol. 16, 25-31. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.4.25
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2006, Vol. 16, 25-31. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.4.25
Speech-language pathologists recognize the importance of educating and supporting individuals with aphasia (IwA) and their family members as essential components of a thoughtful and thorough communication treatment program (Webster & Newhoff,1981).Treatment of persons with aphasia is enhanced when family members receive information, support, and communication training (Holland & Fridriksson, 2001; LaPointe,2005). More recently, emphasis on this treatment responsibility was made evident in ASHA’s Preferred Practice Patterns (ASHA, 2004) for family education. The roles and responsibilities of speech-language pathologists require that “In-tervention involves providing information and guidance to patients/ client, families/caregivers, and other significant persons about the nature of spoken and/or written language disorders, the course of treatment, and prognosis for recovery” (ASHA,2004,p.21–1). Whether services are delivered by an individual clinician or in the context of an interdisciplinary team, IwA and their families should expect education, support, and counseling to result in outcomes that enhance body structure/functionand/oractivity/ participation, as identified with the World Health Organization(WHO) framework(WHO,2001).Conceptualizing stroke, and consequently the onset of aphasia, as a biopsychosocial rather than solely a biomedical event demands that clinicians examine the neurobehavioral consequences of stroke and its effects upon the family as they develop treatment programs (Swartzman, Gibson, & Armstrong, 1998).
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