Management of Dysphagia Following Stroke: A Case Study TW, a 67-year-old woman who sustained a stroke, has been the focus of several articles illustrating evidence-based clinical management.TW was introduced in Issue 3 (Patterson & Avent,2006) and a brief description is included in the introduction to this issue. The purposes of this article are to address issues of ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2006
Management of Dysphagia Following Stroke: A Case Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Purdy
    Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT
  • Editors’ Note: The authors for the series of papers in 2006 Perspectives Issues 3 and 4 were given discretion in the manner in which they addressed the topic. Dr. Purdy has selected the approach of adding detail to the clinical description and illustrating clinical problem solving through discussion of a model assessment and its application under a set of specific clinical assumptions. The same level of detail is not present in all papers.
    Editors’ Note: The authors for the series of papers in 2006 Perspectives Issues 3 and 4 were given discretion in the manner in which they addressed the topic. Dr. Purdy has selected the approach of adding detail to the clinical description and illustrating clinical problem solving through discussion of a model assessment and its application under a set of specific clinical assumptions. The same level of detail is not present in all papers.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2006
Management of Dysphagia Following Stroke: A Case Study
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2006, Vol. 16, 20-25. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.4.20
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2006, Vol. 16, 20-25. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.4.20
TW, a 67-year-old woman who sustained a stroke, has been the focus of several articles illustrating evidence-based clinical management.TW was introduced in Issue 3 (Patterson & Avent,2006) and a brief description is included in the introduction to this issue. The purposes of this article are to address issues of dysphagia management for TW and to illustrate the process of using evidence-based practice for clinical decision making.
ASHA has adopted the World Health Organization(WHO)frame-work (WHO, 2001) to help guide assessment and treatment decisions. The dysphagia assessment is conducted to identify and describe normal and abnormal parameters of structures and functions affecting swallowing and the effects of swallowing impairments on the individual’s activities and participation in everyday situations. In addition, contextual factors that serve as barriers to, or facilitators of, successful swallowing must be considered (ASHA, 2004, p. 146). Inter-vention for dysphagia is designed to capitalize on strengths and address weaknesses related to underlying structures and functions that affect swallowing; facilitate the individual’s activities and participation by assisting the person to acquire new swallowing skills and strategies; and to provide appropriate accommodations and other supports to facilitate swallowing, and training in how to use them (ASHA, 2004, p. 151).
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