Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes (EDS) Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders with defects in connective tissue that supports skin, bones, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and other organs. This defect is a result of faulty collagen, a protein that serves as “glue” by giving strength and elasticity to connective tissue. Weak ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2006
Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes (EDS)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan C. Arvedson
    Children's Hospital of Wisconsin and Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
  • Bonnie Heintskill
    Home Care and Private Practice, Milwaukee, WI
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2006
Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes (EDS)
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2006, Vol. 16, 7-11. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.2.7
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2006, Vol. 16, 7-11. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.2.7
Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders with defects in connective tissue that supports skin, bones, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and other organs. This defect is a result of faulty collagen, a protein that serves as “glue” by giving strength and elasticity to connective tissue. Weak connective tissues create problems with movements and attachments of joints and the endurance of tissues in the body. Defects in connective tissue cause the signs and symptoms of EDS that are characterized by joint hyper-mobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. These connective tissue defects vary from mildly loose joints to life threatening complications. These findings were originally described by Edvard Ehlers (Danish) and Henri-Alex-Andre Danlos (French) in 1899 and 1908, respectively. In 1936, the disorder was named Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The classification of EDS covered only those signs and symptoms dealing with fragile skin until 1967. Gradually classifications were added until eleven distinct types of EDS were described. In 1997, researchers proposed a simpler classification that reduced the number of major types to six and gave them descriptive names (Beighton, De Paepe, Steinmann, Tsipouras, & Wenstrup, 1998; Table 1 on page 8).
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