Speech, Language, and Learning Deficiencies Associated With Tourette's Syndrome Gilles de la Tourette’s syndrome, hereafter referred to as Tourette’s syndrome or TS, is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics, which may appear simultaneously or at different periods during the illness (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000; Singer, 2005). The tics ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2006
Speech, Language, and Learning Deficiencies Associated With Tourette's Syndrome
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L. F. De Nil
    University of Toronto Toronto Western Research Institute Sick Kids Research Institute, Toronto, Canada
  • I. D. Roth
    University of Toronto Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada
  • J. Saltzman-Benaiah
    University of Toronto Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada
  • P. Sandor
    University of Toronto Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network Toronto Western Research Institute Youthdale Treatment Centres, Toronto, Canada
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2006
Speech, Language, and Learning Deficiencies Associated With Tourette's Syndrome
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2006, Vol. 16, 12-16. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.2.12
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2006, Vol. 16, 12-16. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.2.12
Gilles de la Tourette’s syndrome, hereafter referred to as Tourette’s syndrome or TS, is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics, which may appear simultaneously or at different periods during the illness (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000; Singer, 2005). The tics may not be due to direct physiological effects of a chemical substance or general medical condition. The onset of the disorder typically occurs at age 6 and, by definition, must occur before age 18 years. Diagnosis is based solely on clinical criteria. According to the DSM-IV-TR, the prevalence of the disorder is age-dependent and ranges between 5–30 per 10,000 in children and 1-2 per 10,000 in adults in part due spontaneous recovery from tics (APA). However, according to others, the prevalence may be as high as 1–30 per 1000 children and adolescents (Hornse, Banerjee, Zeitlin, & Robertson, 2001; Singer; Traverse, 1998). The etiology of the disorder is unknown, but there is strong evidence which implicates the basal ganglia and dopaminergic functions in the brain (Albin & Mink, 2006).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.