CE Introduction Most clinicians are familiar with the behavioral and clinical gamut of neurogenic language disorders, such as aphasia, dementia, or right hemisphere disorders. Every once in a while, however, we encounter a patient who does not fit into the existing diagnostic classification of the typical Broca’s aphasia or transcortical aphasia. For ... SIG News
SIG News  |   April 01, 2006
CE Introduction
Author Notes
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   April 01, 2006
CE Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2006, Vol. 16, 3. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.1.3
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2006, Vol. 16, 3. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.1.3
Most clinicians are familiar with the behavioral and clinical gamut of neurogenic language disorders, such as aphasia, dementia, or right hemisphere disorders. Every once in a while, however, we encounter a patient who does not fit into the existing diagnostic classification of the typical Broca’s aphasia or transcortical aphasia. For instance, a clinician may be presented with a patient with no obvious language impairment, but a complete inability to identify printed word material. Alternatively, a clinician may see a patient with classic signs of aphasia, but due to a stroke in the right, rather than the left, hemisphere. While most clinicians are familiar with language and behavioral signs associated with dementia, many of us are unfamiliar with the subtypes of dementia. Additionally, differential diagnosis of dementia, a cognitive-linguistic impairment, from primary progressive aphasia, a gradual decline of language abilities, is often difficult in a clinical setting.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.