Crossed Aphasia: A Review of the Syndrome Crossed aphasia (CA) was first described in the literature in 1899 by Bramwell (Alexander & Annett, 1996; Coppens, Hungerford, Yama-guchi, & Yamadori, (2002)). However, when Bramwell coined this term, he was initially referring to the presence of aphasia after a unilateral cerebral lesion of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the patient’s ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2006
Crossed Aphasia: A Review of the Syndrome
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurie M. Sheehy
    Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, OH
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2006
Crossed Aphasia: A Review of the Syndrome
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2006, Vol. 16, 11-16. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.1.11
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2006, Vol. 16, 11-16. doi:10.1044/nnsld16.1.11
Crossed aphasia (CA) was first described in the literature in 1899 by Bramwell (Alexander & Annett, 1996; Coppens, Hungerford, Yama-guchi, & Yamadori, (2002)). However, when Bramwell coined this term, he was initially referring to the presence of aphasia after a unilateral cerebral lesion of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the patient’s dominant hand. That is, not only did his definition include right-hand dominant individuals who exhibited aphasia after a right CVA, but also left-hand dominant persons who exhibited aphasia after a left CVA. The current definition only includes the former group.
Since 1899, hundreds of cases of CA have been reported. Incidence rates range from less than 1% to 18% overall with most studies reporting it to be less than 3% (Alexander & Annett, 1996; Coppens et al., 2002; Pita, Karavelis, & Foroglou, 1997). One reason for the wide range of reported cases is that CA can develop as the result of trauma, vascular disorders, tumors, brain abscesses, or surgical procedures (Bakar, Kirshner, & Wertz, 1996). However, the majority of CA case studies present status post-CVA, in which the vascular lesion has caused relatively precise focal effects.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.