Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Information for School-Based Practitioners The neurodevelopmental disorder we now call attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been described and discussed by health professionals for more than a century. Over the years, a large number of terms for the disorder have been used, ranging from a “defect in moral control” (Still, 1902) to “minimal brain dysfunction” and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Information for School-Based Practitioners
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven G. Zecker
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2004
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Information for School-Based Practitioners
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2004, Vol. 14, 8-13. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.3.8
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2004, Vol. 14, 8-13. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.3.8
The neurodevelopmental disorder we now call attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been described and discussed by health professionals for more than a century. Over the years, a large number of terms for the disorder have been used, ranging from a “defect in moral control” (Still, 1902) to “minimal brain dysfunction” and “hyperkinetic reaction disorder of childhood” (Barkley, 1998). Despite the wide range of labels, the basic behavioral characteristics that constitute ADHD have not changed dramatically.
ADHD is one of the most common developmental disorders of childhood, affecting between 3 and 5% of the school-age population. It is found in all racial groups and cultures. The incidence of diagnosis varies internationally, but these differences are presumed to reflect differences in the awareness of ADHD and the number of practitioners actually diagnosing the disorder, rather than any real difference in incidence. The ratio of males to females with a diagnosis of ADHD varies with the nature of the sample, but averages about 3:1 in the school-age population.
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