Speech-Language Pathology Management of TBI in School-Aged Children Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is broadly defined as brain injury from externally inflicted trauma. It results primarily from accidents involving motor vehicles, falls, acts of violence, and sports. TBI affects people of all ages and is the leading cause of long-term disability among children and young adults. TBI occurs more ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
Speech-Language Pathology Management of TBI in School-Aged Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martha S. Burns
    Clinical Specialist Market, Scientific Learning Corporation, Oakland, CA
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Editor’s Note/Disclosure of Proprietary Interest: Please be advised that the author of this paper has a financial interest in one of the programs she describes (Fast ForWord). Publication of this paper does not constitute an endorsement by ASH A or by any Special Interest Division.
    Editor’s Note/Disclosure of Proprietary Interest: Please be advised that the author of this paper has a financial interest in one of the programs she describes (Fast ForWord). Publication of this paper does not constitute an endorsement by ASH A or by any Special Interest Division.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2004
Speech-Language Pathology Management of TBI in School-Aged Children
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2004, Vol. 14, 14-19. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.3.14
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2004, Vol. 14, 14-19. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.3.14
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is broadly defined as brain injury from externally inflicted trauma. It results primarily from accidents involving motor vehicles, falls, acts of violence, and sports. TBI affects people of all ages and is the leading cause of long-term disability among children and young adults. TBI occurs more than twice as often in males as in females. The estimated incidence rate is one per 1,000 persons with 230,000 people hospitalized yearly who survive and 52,000 annual deaths. The highest incidence in school-age children is among adolescents 15 to 24 years of age, with an additional less striking peak in incidence in children ages 5 and younger. TBI is a disorder of major public health significance, and mild TBI in particular is significantly underdiagnosed (National Institutes of Health [NIH], 1998; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999).
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