Group Therapy is Better Than Individual Therapy: With Special Attention to Stuttering The purpose of the series of articles in this issue of Perspectives is to highlight the significant benefits of group treatment. That stuttering should be included as an example, and especially in a newsletter devoted to neurogenic disorders, is neither far-fetched nor unprecedented. In an earlier issue, the neurological ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
Group Therapy is Better Than Individual Therapy: With Special Attention to Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William S. Rosenthal
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, California State University, Hayward, CA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2004
Group Therapy is Better Than Individual Therapy: With Special Attention to Stuttering
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2004, Vol. 14, 3-8. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.2.3
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2004, Vol. 14, 3-8. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.2.3
The purpose of the series of articles in this issue of Perspectives is to highlight the significant benefits of group treatment. That stuttering should be included as an example, and especially in a newsletter devoted to neurogenic disorders, is neither far-fetched nor unprecedented. In an earlier issue, the neurological connection to stuttering was highlighted (Fox, Ingham, & Ingham, 2003). Recently, a complete issue of the Journal of Fluency Disorders (Ingham, 2003) was devoted to this relationship, as revealed by imaging studies, and a particularly good overview is provided by Fox (2003) .
For most of us, disorders like the aphasias and motor speech disorders have less ambiguous neurogenic origins. It is useful to remember, however, that despite the direct neurological involvement of these disorders, our treatments are essentially behavioral. We do not manipulate the nervous systems of our patients directly, through surgery or medication. Rather, we influence their neural functions by interpersonal interactions. The strong perspective of the current series of articles is that group treatment is a preferred method of delivering behavioral and interpersonal interventions.
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