Clinical Committee: “Pick of the Lit” This column by the Division 2 Clinical Issues Committee highlights a selection of recent, clinically relevant journal articles. This edition’s selections were submitted by Caroline Royal-Evans and Brenda Wilson. Other members of the committee are Nancy Alarcon, Anita Halper, and Marsha Howell. Clausen, N.S. and Beeson, P. M. (2003). Conversational ... Committee Corner
Committee Corner  |   June 01, 2004
Clinical Committee: “Pick of the Lit”
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Committee Corner
Committee Corner   |   June 01, 2004
Clinical Committee: “Pick of the Lit”
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2004, Vol. 14, 26-29. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.2.26
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2004, Vol. 14, 26-29. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.2.26
This column by the Division 2 Clinical Issues Committee highlights a selection of recent, clinically relevant journal articles. This edition’s selections were submitted by Caroline Royal-Evans and Brenda Wilson. Other members of the committee are Nancy Alarcon, Anita Halper, and Marsha Howell.
Clausen, N.S. and Beeson, P. M. (2003). Conversational use of writing in severe aphasia: A group treatment approach. Aphasiology, 17, 625–644.
This study examined the outcomes of group and individual treatment using copy and recall treatment (CART) with four individuals with chronic severe Broca’s aphasia. Target words were functional words generated by the participant with the assistance of his or her spouse and clinician. In the individual sessions, each participant worked with a clinician directly on writing the target words, reviewed homework with the clinician, and practiced the target words in conversation. Group therapy provided an opportunity to use these skills in a structured conversational setting with several communication partners. In the final phase of therapy, the participants interacted with unfamiliar communication partners. All four participants showed improvement, although, not surprisingly, they had more difficulties communicating with the unfamiliar partners in the final phase. This study supports the idea that (a) writing may be a viable mode of communication for individuals with severe aphasia, for whom spoken language is not an option, and (b) group therapy is an effective avenue for developing and implementing these skills.
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