Group Treatment Across Disorders Group treatment is a widely used approach for a variety of communication disorders. It has gained popularity because of its psychosocially enriched environment and improved efficiency for speech-language pathologists (Goldberg, 1993). It has been in use with children for over 50 years (Backus & Beasley, 1951; Nemoy & Davis, 1937) ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
Group Treatment Across Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan Avent
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, California State University, Hayward, CA
  • Minnie Graham
    Department of Special Education, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA
  • Robert Peppard
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, California State University, Hayward, CA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2004
Group Treatment Across Disorders
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2004, Vol. 14, 23-25. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.2.23
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2004, Vol. 14, 23-25. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.2.23
Group treatment is a widely used approach for a variety of communication disorders. It has gained popularity because of its psychosocially enriched environment and improved efficiency for speech-language pathologists (Goldberg, 1993). It has been in use with children for over 50 years (Backus & Beasley, 1951; Nemoy & Davis, 1937) and is supported by federal mandates to provide treatment in the least restrictive settings (Brinton, Fujiki, Montague, & Hanton, 2000; Farber & Klein, 1999; Throneburg, Calvert,Sturm,&Paramboukas,2000). Group treatment for adults began in the 1940s for aphasia (Kearns & Elman, 2000) and the 1950s for stuttering (Dreikurs & Corsini, 1954) and continues to be used widely in various adult populations, including individuals with laryngectomy (Graham, 1997),aphasia (Avent, 1997;Mar-shall, 1999), traumatic brain injury (Ylvisaker, Szekeres, & Feeney, 2000), deafness (Schein, 1982), and fluency disorders (Conture, 2001). The widespread use of groups in the treatment of communication disorders suggests that they may have similar underlying principles that could be used to define a model of group treatment.
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