Reciprocal Scaffolding Treatment for Aphasia Group treatment for aphasia has advantages beyond its efficacy (Elman & Bernstein-Ellis, 1999; Wertz et al., 1981) and efficiency (Marshall, 1999) as a means to address broader views of well-being. The interactive nature of group treatment may benefit individuals with aphasia by providing improved quality of life and successful adaptation ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
Reciprocal Scaffolding Treatment for Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan Avent
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, California State University, Hayward, CA
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2004
Reciprocal Scaffolding Treatment for Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2004, Vol. 14, 15-18. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.2.15
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2004, Vol. 14, 15-18. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.2.15
Group treatment for aphasia has advantages beyond its efficacy (Elman & Bernstein-Ellis, 1999; Wertz et al., 1981) and efficiency (Marshall, 1999) as a means to address broader views of well-being. The interactive nature of group treatment may benefit individuals with aphasia by providing improved quality of life and successful adaptation to the chronicity of the aphasia. The purpose of this article is to present a broader perspective on the benefits of a group treatment in a unique context.
In 2001, ASHA’s Legislative Council adopted the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework for the new scope of practice guidelines for speech-language pathologists (Threats, 2002  and see the April 2004 issue of Perspectives). The purpose of the guidelines includes establishing a unifying language across all disorders and expanding the scope of assessment and treatment to include communicative competence in interpersonal interactions in community, social, and civic life. This expanded scope of practice is well described by social approaches to treatment that require that treatment take place in appropriate settings, involve real communication, recognize the reciprocal nature of communication, focus on social and information exchanges of communication (Simmons-Mackie, 2001), and increase participation in life (Chapey et al., 2001). Group treatment by its very nature addresses this expanded scope of practice by providing opportunities to improve communicative competence during social interactions.
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