The Use of the ICF in Intervention for Persons With Neurogenic Communication Disorders The World Health Organization (WHO) published the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps in 1980 as a draft document. This document was among the first to acknowledge that disability existed on more than one level. In 1995, there began an effort to update and revise the WHO system into ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2004
The Use of the ICF in Intervention for Persons With Neurogenic Communication Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Travis Threats
    Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / International & Global / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2004
The Use of the ICF in Intervention for Persons With Neurogenic Communication Disorders
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2004, Vol. 14, 4-8. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.1.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2004, Vol. 14, 4-8. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.1.4
The World Health Organization (WHO) published the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps in 1980 as a draft document. This document was among the first to acknowledge that disability existed on more than one level. In 1995, there began an effort to update and revise the WHO system into one that could be useful to a wide variety of individuals including researchers, epidemiologists, public policy makers, clinicians, and persons with disabilities. In 2001, the WHO published the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). In that same year, ASHA used the ICF as the framework for the Scope of Practice for Speech-Language Pathology (ASHA, 2001). Currently, the committee that is revising the Preferred Practice Patterns for Speech-Language Pathology is working to incorporate the ICF into a description of intervention with all of the specific communication disabilities speech-language pathologists treat (R. Gilliam, personal communication, August 1, 2003).
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