CEU Introduction The authors in this issue discuss the use of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001) for intervention with persons with neurogenic communication disorders . The ICF is used by ASH A in its 2001 Scope of Practice for Speech-Language Pathology as the ... SIG News
SIG News  |   April 01, 2004
CEU Introduction
Author Notes
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   April 01, 2004
CEU Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2004, Vol. 14, 2-3. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.1.2
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2004, Vol. 14, 2-3. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.1.2
The authors in this issue discuss the use of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001) for intervention with persons with neurogenic communication disorders . The ICF is used by ASH A in its 2001 Scope of Practice for Speech-Language Pathology as the framework for the field. In addition, the Preferred Practice Patterns in the Profession of Speech-Language Pathology currently are being revised and will include ICF constructs.
In the first article, I provide a brief description of the ICF, then address some of the major concerns with using the ICF for assessment and intervention. I make the point that the ICF has an underlying patient-centered philosophy that makes it more than simply a method of assigning numbers to a disorder.
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