The Role of fMRI in Aphasiology: Interface Between Technology, Theory, and Clinical Care Although introduced just over a decade ago (Owaga et al., 1992), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques have quickly become a critical tool for understanding brain-behavior relationships. The power of functional neuroimaging tools to visualize cognitive processing, including language, in the intact human brain has triggered a rapid and prolific ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2003
The Role of fMRI in Aphasiology: Interface Between Technology, Theory, and Clinical Care
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jamie Mayer
    Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Article Information
Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2003
The Role of fMRI in Aphasiology: Interface Between Technology, Theory, and Clinical Care
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2003, Vol. 13, 4-7. doi:10.1044/nnsld13.4.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2003, Vol. 13, 4-7. doi:10.1044/nnsld13.4.4
Although introduced just over a decade ago (Owaga et al., 1992), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques have quickly become a critical tool for understanding brain-behavior relationships. The power of functional neuroimaging tools to visualize cognitive processing, including language, in the intact human brain has triggered a rapid and prolific expansion of research. This literature base has important implications for the field of communication sciences and disorders, in which theories about brain-language relationships have been derived traditionally from lesion studies. It is worth remembering that both approaches have limitations, however: Lesion studies can only reveal regions that are critical for a given function, and imaging studies can only identify regions that are active during a particular cognitive activity, not if they are critical or supplementary (Binder et al., 1997; Nadeau & Crosson, 1995). Imaging studies of patients with brain damage provide important evidence regarding the necessity of particular brain regions for specific cognitive functions and should begin to shed light on some of the inconsistencies noted between neuroimaging and lesion data (Martin, 2003; Zahn et al., 2002).
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