Functional Neuroimaging of “Executive” Dysfunction in Traumatic Brain Injury: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective More than 2 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. Of the survivors, over 80,000 will experience permanent disabilities (National Institutes of Health, 1998; Thurman, Alverson, Dunn, Guerrero, & Sniezek, 1999), often resulting from cognitive impairments. TBI-related cognitive deficits can have a profound impact ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2003
Functional Neuroimaging of “Executive” Dysfunction in Traumatic Brain Injury: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael J. Larson
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Kiesa G. Kelly
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • William M. Perlstein
    University of Florida, Gainesville
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2003
Functional Neuroimaging of “Executive” Dysfunction in Traumatic Brain Injury: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2003, Vol. 13, 20-29. doi:10.1044/nnsld13.4.20
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2003, Vol. 13, 20-29. doi:10.1044/nnsld13.4.20
More than 2 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. Of the survivors, over 80,000 will experience permanent disabilities (National Institutes of Health, 1998; Thurman, Alverson, Dunn, Guerrero, & Sniezek, 1999), often resulting from cognitive impairments. TBI-related cognitive deficits can have a profound impact on a survivor’s ability to return to his or her previous level of functioning and often significantly reduce quality of life for survivors and caregivers (Arciniegas, Held, & Wagner, 2002). The development of effective rehabilitation and compensatory strategies requires accurate cognitive assessment and a detailed understanding of the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying cognitive impairments. In the present paper, we briefly review findings from functional neuroimaging studies of executive functioning in individuals with TBI, including studies using both hemodynamic response-based measures of brain activity (positron emission tomography, PET; functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI) and electrophysiologically based measures (scalp-recorded brain event-related potentials, ERPs) to characterize the nature of this impairment. We also present preliminary findings from two recently completed studies to illustrate the application of these methods to the study of TBI-related cognitive dysfunction.
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