CEU Introduction The three articles in this issue give three different perspectives on functional imaging of communication disorders. The first article tackles the problem of tracking developmental changes in neural activity. In the decade since functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research burst on the scene, there have been surprisingly few developmental studies. ... SIG News
SIG News  |   June 01, 2003
CEU Introduction
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Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   June 01, 2003
CEU Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2003, Vol. 13, 2-3. doi:10.1044/nnsld13.2.2
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2003, Vol. 13, 2-3. doi:10.1044/nnsld13.2.2
The three articles in this issue give three different perspectives on functional imaging of communication disorders. The first article tackles the problem of tracking developmental changes in neural activity. In the decade since functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research burst on the scene, there have been surprisingly few developmental studies. Brown and his colleagues from Washington University at St. Louis summarize a number of technical issues that compromise the interpretation of developmental differences in fMRI investigations. They then describe a novel method of analysis intended to separate performance related differences in activation from true developmental changes. Part of their strategy involved a direct testing of the assumption that gross developmental changes in anatomy make it inappropriate to warp scans from different developmental stages into the same stereotaxic space. They have performed a series of studies to test that assumption and have concluded that developmental changes in the average location of sulci are less than the spatial resolution of fMRI, and thus are unlikely to have an impact on the results. They argue that the benefits of direct comparison in the same stereotaxic space outweigh any possible advantages of more accurate normalization to a separate pediatric template. Using this strategy they found that during word generation tasks, posterior visual association areas were more active in children while dorsolateral frontal cortex was less active. Since activation generally reflects synaptic input to an area, this result suggests that posterior input to frontal regions is increasing with development. It would be interesting to know whether this change is accompanied by maturation of frontal networks that could be studied during individual development.
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