Structural CT and MRI—The Basics As technology advances and newer imaging techniques are introduced into medical practice every year, it might be tempting to regard basic computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as outdated. Along with straightforward x-ray, however, structural CT and MRI continue to be the foundation of clinical imaging practices. They ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2003
Structural CT and MRI—The Basics
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carolyn R. Baylor
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2003
Structural CT and MRI—The Basics
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2003, Vol. 13, 18-24. doi:10.1044/nnsld13.1.18
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2003, Vol. 13, 18-24. doi:10.1044/nnsld13.1.18
As technology advances and newer imaging techniques are introduced into medical practice every year, it might be tempting to regard basic computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as outdated. Along with straightforward x-ray, however, structural CT and MRI continue to be the foundation of clinical imaging practices. They remain the primary tools that radiologists rely upon daily for diagnostic imaging. Structural CT and MRI also provide the foundation on which many of the newer functional or dynamic imaging techniques were developed.
While it is not within the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists and audiologists to order, conduct, or interpret CT or MRI studies, communication specialists routinely use information from these studies. Speech-language pathologists and audiologists must read the medical reports of patients and understand how a patient’s medical condition may contribute to communication impairments and proposed interventions. Clinicians also must be prepared to participate in discussions with the patient and medical team regarding medical diagnoses and implications for communication needs. Thus, basic familiarity with CT and MRI technology and methodology is imperative for professionals in the communication health care fields. The purpose of this paper is to provide this basic tutorial. While CT and MRI imaging are used for all regions of the body, this paper will focus on brain imaging.
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