Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatment Approaches for Dysarthria: Perspectives on a Controversial Clinical Practice This article addresses non-speech oral motor treatments and reports the results of a search for evidence of their effectiveness in improving the speech of persons with dysarthria. The term oral motor treatment refers to a range of nonspeech and speech-like activities used to achieve a variety of goals that involve ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2002
Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatment Approaches for Dysarthria: Perspectives on a Controversial Clinical Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Megan M. Hodge
    University of AlbertaEdmonton, Alberta, Canada
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2002
Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatment Approaches for Dysarthria: Perspectives on a Controversial Clinical Practice
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2002, Vol. 12, 22-28. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.4.22
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2002, Vol. 12, 22-28. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.4.22
This article addresses non-speech oral motor treatments and reports the results of a search for evidence of their effectiveness in improving the speech of persons with dysarthria. The term oral motor treatment refers to a range of nonspeech and speech-like activities used to achieve a variety of goals that involve actions of the lips, jaw, and tongue. Interested readers should refer to the comprehensive review by Chapman Bahr (2001)  for further information on this topic. Typically, these treatments are limited to behavioral techniques applied by professionals (e.g., oromyo-functional therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists) who are members of health service delivery teams, but they may be conducted in conjunction with surgical, orthodontic or pharmacological treatments in an attempt to maximize the functional benefits of these medical procedures (ASHA, 1993; Dworkin, 1991).
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