Intervention for Memory Disorders after TBI Wilson (1995) laments the gulf that separates medical professionals, who dismiss memory impairment following traumatic brain injury (TBI) as “untreatable,” and survivors and families, who remain optimistic that the problems will go away. While she admits that “there is no known way that lost memory functioning can be restored….once the ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
Intervention for Memory Disorders after TBI
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack Avery
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Mary R. T. Kennedy
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2002
Intervention for Memory Disorders after TBI
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2002, Vol. 12, 9-14. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.3.9
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2002, Vol. 12, 9-14. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.3.9
Wilson (1995) laments the gulf that separates medical professionals, who dismiss memory impairment following traumatic brain injury (TBI) as “untreatable,” and survivors and families, who remain optimistic that the problems will go away. While she admits that “there is no known way that lost memory functioning can be restored….once the period of natural recovery is over” she maintains that the lives of clients with brain injury can be improved by helping them “bypass certain problems, or compensate for them, or use their residual skills more efficiently” (p. 452). Since disrupted memory is the most diagnosed cognitive impairment after injury and the most debilitating in everyday living (Glisky & Schacter, 1986; Tate, 1997), we must take this charge seriously.
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