CEU Part I: Clinical Outcomes Clinical outcomes are many and varied. Furthermore, any one clinical outcome might be assessed using one or more instruments designed specifically for that purpose. Selecting from among types of outcomes, as well as from among the various options for capturing them, is the product of important and difficult decisions for ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2001
CEU Part I: Clinical Outcomes
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Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2001
CEU Part I: Clinical Outcomes
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2001, Vol. 11, 4-5. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.1.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2001, Vol. 11, 4-5. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.1.4
Clinical outcomes are many and varied. Furthermore, any one clinical outcome might be assessed using one or more instruments designed specifically for that purpose. Selecting from among types of outcomes, as well as from among the various options for capturing them, is the product of important and difficult decisions for clinicians and researchers.
Conceptually, a clinical outcome is a change in patient status associated with a certain procedure or decision. In an operational sense, measurements of a clinical outcome constitute evidence for answering questions about clinical practice and patient care. In general practice, the questions may concern benefits and risks (e.g., morbidity, mortality) associated with clinical procedures. But the interest of speech-language pathologists often focuses on the end-result status of patients with respect to a particular intervention. End-result, or final, outcomes are sometimes measured at discharge from treatment (e.g., clinical applications); they may also be measured sometime after treatment ends (e.g., research applications). The interesting dimension of patient state (or perhaps the status of a significant other) relative to a certain intervention is thoughtfully determined (usually before a particular patient is admitted to service) and, it is hoped, results in an accurate index of derived benefit attributable to the intervention. These benefits are sometimes clinician determined (e.g., performance on a clinical index) and sometimes patient determined (e.g., response to a questionnaire).
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