The Power of One: Clinical Practice in Neurogenics: Advocacy Partners: Utilizing Your National Associations In the June 2000 issue of this newsletter, I wrote about “Faces of Aphasia: An Afternoon of Music, Theatre, Poetry and Film,” an extraordinary event produced by speech-language pathologist Jerry Kaplan and the Aphasia Community Group of Boston with a grant from the National Stroke Association. One highlight of that ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2000
The Power of One: Clinical Practice in Neurogenics: Advocacy Partners: Utilizing Your National Associations
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The Power of One: Clinical Practice in Neurogenics
Article   |   October 01, 2000
The Power of One: Clinical Practice in Neurogenics: Advocacy Partners: Utilizing Your National Associations
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2000, Vol. 10, 28. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.3.28
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2000, Vol. 10, 28. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.3.28
In the June 2000 issue of this newsletter, I wrote about “Faces of Aphasia: An Afternoon of Music, Theatre, Poetry and Film,” an extraordinary event produced by speech-language pathologist Jerry Kaplan and the Aphasia Community Group of Boston with a grant from the National Stroke Association. One highlight of that event was the return-to-stage of opera singer Jan Curtis whose 1995 stroke and persistent severe aphasia had cut short her career. Jan’s story was told in a front-page Boston Globe article by the music critic Richard Dyer and picked up by local television stations including New England Cable Network who hosted Jan, Richard, and Jerry on a special show. As a result of this publicity, Jerry was contacted by a person from ABC Lifetime Live (a new show hosted by Dana Reeve, the wife of Christopher Reeve) who asked for video clips from Jan’s performance and television appearance. Jerry sent these and waited for a response for 3 months. After a few phone calls of inquiry to the contact person, Jerry received back the tapes with a post-it note saying that Lifetime Live would not be doing the story because Ms. Curtis “couldn’t really tell it in her own words. Her speaking ability is simply too limited.” (Ironically, while ABC was making this decision, Jan was notified that she will be receiving the Annie Glenn Award at the National Council on Communication Disorders (NCCD) ceremony to be held in conjunction with the ASHA Convention in Washington, DC this year.)
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