Communicating With Your Legislators: Advocating Effectively for Your Patients During the spring 2000 Florida legislative session, members on the Florida Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists (FLASHA) received a surprising email from the association office on behalf of Amy Young, the Association’s Legislative Consultant (see companion article). Besides thanking members for contacting the senator who had sponsored an unfavorable ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2000
Communicating With Your Legislators: Advocating Effectively for Your Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Virginia G. Walker
    Department of Communication Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2000
Communicating With Your Legislators: Advocating Effectively for Your Patients
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2000, Vol. 10, 19-21. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.3.19
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2000, Vol. 10, 19-21. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.3.19
During the spring 2000 Florida legislative session, members on the Florida Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists (FLASHA) received a surprising email from the association office on behalf of Amy Young, the Association’s Legislative Consultant (see companion article). Besides thanking members for contacting the senator who had sponsored an unfavorable bill, it requested that everyone stop contacting the senator. The issue had been resolved by compromise.
This incident demonstrates that speech-language pathologists and audiologists can affect legislative issues when their efforts are properly and appropriately initiated and coordinated. This has been particularly evident in terms of recent victories on the national and state levels concerning such issues as Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement, newborn hearing screening, IDEA funding, CPT codes, and public school salary supplements (see, for instance, ASHA Leader articles: “Idea Funding Bill Passes U.S. House,” May 23, 2000; Moore, February 1, 2000; March 14, 2000; March 28, 2000). Nevertheless, there are some strategies that members of our professions, including Division 2 affiliates, may find useful in communicating with legislators and other public policymakers.
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