Introduction: Update on Pharmacological and Medical Management of Neurological Disorders The 1990s were declared the “Decade of the Brain.” Though the designation did not come with earmarked federal funds, it did galvanize neuroscience research, and there was a sense of tremendous energy and excitement in neuroscience communities around the world. Advances in communication and data transmission fostered the development of ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2000
Introduction: Update on Pharmacological and Medical Management of Neurological Disorders
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  • Lyn TurkstraIssue Editor
Article Information
Introduction
Article   |   June 01, 2000
Introduction: Update on Pharmacological and Medical Management of Neurological Disorders
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2000, Vol. 10, 3. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.2.3
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2000, Vol. 10, 3. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.2.3
The 1990s were declared the “Decade of the Brain.” Though the designation did not come with earmarked federal funds, it did galvanize neuroscience research, and there was a sense of tremendous energy and excitement in neuroscience communities around the world. Advances in communication and data transmission fostered the development of international collaborations. Technical advances, particularly in molecular and cellular biology, computational modeling, and neurophysiology, allowed researchers to ask questions we could not have imagined as recently as 10 or 20 years ago. The results are only beginning to emerge.
It is clear that basic human neuroscience has benefited from this climate of growth and development. The translation of these benefits to clinical neuroscience has been less clear, though there are many promising applications of basic findings on the horizon. It is the promise of clinical benefit that led to the theme of this issue and a later issue this year: a “state of the art” discussion of neurological and surgical intervention techniques for patients with neurological impairments. Dr. Francois Bethoux describes recent advances in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Dr. Valerie Cwik discusses the tragedy of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and new hopes for treatment. Ahmad Khaldi and his colleagues including Dr Ross Bullock, Past President of the National Neurotrauma Society, describe current management strategies for patients with traumatic brain injury. In the next issue, leading authors discuss innovations in the management of neglect, movement disorders, and stroke.
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