Neurosurgical Management of Head Injury Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the major contributor to trauma death. However, in the past few years, there have been improvements in the treatment of severe TBI (i.e., associated with scores of 3–8 on Glasgow Coma Scale), due to better monitoring as well as better management. Therefore, more patients ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2000
Neurosurgical Management of Head Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ahmad Khaldi
    Division of Neurosurgery and Department of Speech Pathology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
  • Woodford Beach
    Division of Neurosurgery and Department of Speech Pathology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
  • Tobias Clausen
    Division of Neurosurgery and Department of Speech Pathology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
  • Ross Bullock
    Division of Neurosurgery and Department of Speech Pathology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2000
Neurosurgical Management of Head Injury
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2000, Vol. 10, 16-20. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.2.16
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2000, Vol. 10, 16-20. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.2.16
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the major contributor to trauma death. However, in the past few years, there have been improvements in the treatment of severe TBI (i.e., associated with scores of 3–8 on Glasgow Coma Scale), due to better monitoring as well as better management. Therefore, more patients are surviving severe TBI.
Primary brain traumatic injury due to acceleration/deceleration forces can cause focal cerebral contusions, diffuse axonal injury (see Figure 1 on page 17) or intracranial hematoma. The degree and extent of the damage usually indicate the prognosis.
Secondary damage, which involves a hypoxic or ischemic-type of insult, is usually localized (focal) but it can also be systemic as in the case of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) or in metabolic disequilibrium (see Figure 2 on page 17). The secondary damage is delayed and can be either focal or diffuse. Current treatments are aimed at preventing events that lead to secondary damage (Chestnut, 1997).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.