TBI Case Studies: Introduction Traumatic brain injury rehabilitation has entered a “new age” of sorts. As in the New Age in Sedona, AZ, change has resulted from the convergence of powerful forces—in this case, the disability movement, managed care, and advances in knowledge about the consequences of TBI of any severity. In this new ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1998
TBI Case Studies: Introduction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lyn Turkstra
    Department of Communication Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
    Issue Editor
Article Information
Neurogenic Language Case Studies
Article   |   May 01, 1998
TBI Case Studies: Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, May 1998, Vol. 8, 3. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.2.3
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, May 1998, Vol. 8, 3. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.2.3
Traumatic brain injury rehabilitation has entered a “new age” of sorts. As in the New Age in Sedona, AZ, change has resulted from the convergence of powerful forces—in this case, the disability movement, managed care, and advances in knowledge about the consequences of TBI of any severity. In this new age, the focus of rehabilitation must be on minimizing handicap, and the person with TBI is empowered in the intervention process. Therapy must not only have face validity for the client, but incorporate relevant contexts. A flexible approach to service delivery is necessary.
These three case studies exemplify the new age in TBI rehabilitation. In the team approach described by Kathleen Cazzato, the entire intervention process was shaped by a specific desired outcome. McKay Moore Sohlberg and Laurie Ehlhardt share a practical strategy for the treatment of confabulation. Their incorporation of a caregiver into the assessment process both increased the efficiency of service delivery and improved the quality of interaction between the caregiver and the person with TBI. Mark Ylvisaker and Tim Feeney present a Vygotskian approach to intervention, based on an apprenticeship model with support from everyday people in the person’s life.
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