Recent Breakthroughs in Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors, Biological Markers, Cognitive and Linguistic Distinctions, and Pharmacological Interventions Consistent with previous issues of the 1997 Special Interest Division 2 Newsletter, this issue focuses on the genotypic and phenotypic expression of a disease of concern to our profession. In the present publication the focus is Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). There is probably no other disease for which it is ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 1997
Recent Breakthroughs in Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors, Biological Markers, Cognitive and Linguistic Distinctions, and Pharmacological Interventions
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra Bond Chapman
    Brain Research and Treatment Center at Callier University of Texas-Dallas
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 1997
Recent Breakthroughs in Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors, Biological Markers, Cognitive and Linguistic Distinctions, and Pharmacological Interventions
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 1997, Vol. 7, 4-5. doi:10.1044/nnsld7.4.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 1997, Vol. 7, 4-5. doi:10.1044/nnsld7.4.4
Consistent with previous issues of the 1997 Special Interest Division 2 Newsletter, this issue focuses on the genotypic and phenotypic expression of a disease of concern to our profession. In the present publication the focus is Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). There is probably no other disease for which it is more vital for speech-language pathologists to stay abreast of the rapid advances in understanding neurobiological and neurobehavioral aspects. Until relatively recently, AD was considered a rare disorder. However, it is now recognized as one of the most prevalent and expensive public health problems in adults facing our nation. It is estimated that over 4 million people in the United States have this progressive, degenerative brain disease. Ninety percent of the cases are identified after the age of 65 years and the prevalence doubles every successive decade of life. The yearly costs of AD are estimated to be approximately $85 billion dollars. Diagnosis of AD has a profound effect on families, extended care networks, and, perhaps most important, the person turned patient.
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