Plasticity and Recovery From Brain Damage in Adulthood: What Can Recovery From Aphasia Teach Us? Plasticity can be defined narrowly to refer to neuroplasticity, the ability of the nervous system to modify its own structural organization and function in response to environmental or internal changes. Neuroplastic mechanisms include the anatomical, physiological, and morphological changes that take place within the nervous system during normal development, ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1997
Plasticity and Recovery From Brain Damage in Adulthood: What Can Recovery From Aphasia Teach Us?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janice Feagin Del Toro
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1997
Plasticity and Recovery From Brain Damage in Adulthood: What Can Recovery From Aphasia Teach Us?
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 1997, Vol. 7, 8-15. doi:10.1044/nnsld7.3.8
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 1997, Vol. 7, 8-15. doi:10.1044/nnsld7.3.8
Plasticity can be defined narrowly to refer to neuroplasticity, the ability of the nervous system to modify its own structural organization and function in response to environmental or internal changes. Neuroplastic mechanisms include the anatomical, physiological, and morphological changes that take place within the nervous system during normal development, during conditions of new learning, and in response to injury. It was once believed that neural systems were highly plastic only during a short developmental, or critical, period. However, the recent investigation of adult plasticity in cortical representations has yielded considerable data suggesting that the adult brain is normally capable of dynamic change.
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