Sorting Pictures to Assess Participation in Life Activities At the University of North Carolina Hearing and Communication Center, speech-language pathologists and occupational therapists work collaboratively to facilitate communication success and engagement in meaningful life activities for participants in our aphasia program. The weekly conversation groups are at the center of much of the action. Each week, a rich ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2005
Sorting Pictures to Assess Participation in Life Activities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katarina Haley
    University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • Kimberly Jenkins
    University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • Clay Hadden
    University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • Jenny Womack
    University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • Joseph Hall
    University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • Cathleen Schweiker
    University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2005
Sorting Pictures to Assess Participation in Life Activities
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2005, Vol. 15, 11-15. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.4.11
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2005, Vol. 15, 11-15. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.4.11
At the University of North Carolina Hearing and Communication Center, speech-language pathologists and occupational therapists work collaboratively to facilitate communication success and engagement in meaningful life activities for participants in our aphasia program. The weekly conversation groups are at the center of much of the action. Each week, a rich sample of life activities is discussed, and group members support each other in the pursuit of meaningful social, leisure, and work related activities. When new participants join a group, or when new groups are formed, advance information about interests and experiences is particularly helpful for the group facilitator, but not always easily accessible. In addition, knowledge about valued life activities and priorities and about current and previous participation patterns is necessary for individualized counseling and consultation services, but the presence of aphasia can get in the way of communicating this information effectively. Below, we describe an approach we have found useful for obtaining individualized, qualitative information about life activities from people with aphasia. We discuss the priorities that helped us identify a suitable instrument and suggest adaptations to improve the application of this instrument to individuals with aphasia.
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