Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies on Aphasia Revisited The Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), with its multiple medical centers throughout the nation, is an excellent environment for conducting multi-center clinical trials. A multi-center trial is prompted for a variety of reasons, however, the typical motivation is to obtain a sample size that would not be attainable at a ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2005
Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies on Aphasia Revisited
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert T. Wertz
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Article Information
Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2005
Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies on Aphasia Revisited
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2005, Vol. 15, 6-13. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.3.6
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2005, Vol. 15, 6-13. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.3.6
The Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), with its multiple medical centers throughout the nation, is an excellent environment for conducting multi-center clinical trials. A multi-center trial is prompted for a variety of reasons, however, the typical motivation is to obtain a sample size that would not be attainable at a single site. Within the DVA, multi-center research falls under the Cooperative Studies Research Service (CSRS).
In the 1970s and 1980s, two cooperative studies focused on the treatment of aphasia. This paper revisits those two efforts and speculates on how they have withstood the test of time. Note that both occurred prior to the excellent instruction provided by Robey (2004, 2005) and Robey and Schultz (1998)  on conducting treatment outcomes research. Nevertheless, I will provide a history for each study, the designs, the results obtained, and the conclusions that appeared warranted. Then, I will sift the efforts through a sieve of subsequent comments in the literature and what we might have said had we known what Robey and Schultz said later.
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