Education and Mentoring When did you decide to go into speech-language pathology? How did you find out that you could specialize in neurogenic communication disorders? Some of us discovered the field through personal situations, such as living with a family member who needed SLP services. Others of us stumbled into the major as ... Committee Corner
Committee Corner  |   October 01, 2005
Education and Mentoring
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Committee Corner
Committee Corner   |   October 01, 2005
Education and Mentoring
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2005, Vol. 15, 28. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.3.28
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2005, Vol. 15, 28. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.3.28
When did you decide to go into speech-language pathology? How did you find out that you could specialize in neurogenic communication disorders? Some of us discovered the field through personal situations, such as living with a family member who needed SLP services. Others of us stumbled into the major as college juniors or seniors after other majors failed to capture our interests. Very few of us heard about SLP in high school when we visited a vocational counselor or attended a job fair. The Education and Mentoring Committee of Division 2 wants to change that.
A key focus of the Education and Mentoring Committee is recruiting young people into our field, specifically to work with individuals with acquired neurogenic communication disorders. It seems that every week the media reports on some recent research finding related to brain function. So, one of our goals is to create products and resources that introduce high school students and college freshman to the important work we do with individuals who have neurogenic communication disorders. Our goal is to collect materials and post them on Division 2’s Web page (on ASHA’s Web site), thereby making them available to any Division 2 affiliate. Last month, a request was sent out on Division 2’s e-mail list to share materials you have used, by sending the names of published materials and PowerPoint presentations to Mary Kennedy (kenne047@umn.edu). The range of topics is very broad, from overviews of the central nervous system, to more specific speech and language disorders that result from disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer’s disease. Thank you to those of you who sent us presentations, though we know there are many more of you who are involved in educating and recruiting. Please consider sharing your materials with your colleagues by contacting Mary Kennedy.
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