A Residential Approach to Conversational Intervention Living with aphasia presents long-term challenges to affected persons and their family caregivers (Herrmann & Wallesch, 1989; Le Dorze & Brassard, 1995; Sarno, 1993). The termination of therapy marks an end to the intensive support provided by the rehabilitation team. Often, this comes at a time when families are still ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
A Residential Approach to Conversational Intervention
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn E. Fox
    Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • Susan Ginley
    Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • Susan B. Poulsen
    Portland State University, Portland, OR
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
A Residential Approach to Conversational Intervention
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 4-10. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.4.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 4-10. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.4.4
Living with aphasia presents long-term challenges to affected persons and their family caregivers (Herrmann & Wallesch, 1989; Le Dorze & Brassard, 1995; Sarno, 1993). The termination of therapy marks an end to the intensive support provided by the rehabilitation team. Often, this comes at a time when families are still trying to find equilibrium in their new roles and identities (Lyon & Shadden, 2001). For some, the task of finding a new balance is complicated by the presence of unresolved personal and social needs (Denman, 1998; Michallet, Le Dorze, & Tétreault, 2001). The need for information about the nature of aphasia and a partner’s capabilities and disabilities, as well as concerns about day-to-day issues, continue long after the conclusion of therapy. Other needs often intensify as families resume life’s routines, such as the need to accept temporary role changes as new life patterns, and the need for respite from extended periods of caregiving. Over time, partners may also begin to feel a heightened need for conversation. For some families, these changes occur in an environment of increased isolation and reduced support from a pre-aphasia social network. If, as Shadden (2004)  has suggested, the ultimate measure of recovery after aphasia is the strength of one’s social identity, isolation may make it more difficult for people with aphasia and their caregivers to shape a new sense of self.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.