Return to Work After Stroke The return to work after stroke is a critical predictor of subjective assessments of quality of life for young stroke survivors (Hamedanie, et al, 2001; Teasell, McRae, & Finestone, 2000). Vestling, Tufvesson, and Iwarsson (2003)  reported that returning to work is a major factor in achievement of high subjective well-being ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
Return to Work After Stroke
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Solomon
    Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO
Article Information
Special Populations / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
Return to Work After Stroke
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 19-23. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.4.19
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 19-23. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.4.19
The return to work after stroke is a critical predictor of subjective assessments of quality of life for young stroke survivors (Hamedanie, et al, 2001; Teasell, McRae, & Finestone, 2000). Vestling, Tufvesson, and Iwarsson (2003)  reported that returning to work is a major factor in achievement of high subjective well-being and life satisfaction, stating that, “Work fulfills basic human needs such as financial, societal, and intrinsic needs, and returning to work after stroke is of significant importance for quality of life satisfaction” (p. 127).
The following are the results of interviews with two young women, conducted at one year post-stroke. The comments of these individuals provide a view into relevant issues related to return to work following stroke and aphasia. Susan was successful in returning to work, while Claire continues to search for employment almost 2 years after her stroke. Both women shared information about the aftermath of stroke, rehabilitation, and their lives.
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