Two Case Studies of Family Influence on Treatment Outcome After Stroke The influence of family on rehabilitation has long been recognized. Nearly all the major textbooks of neurogenic communication disorders comment on the positive effect a supportive family can have on the final outcome of rehabilitation (Brookshire, 2003; Duffy, 1995; Johnson & Jacobson, 1998; Myers, 1999; Tompkins, 1995). For example, Brookshire ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
Two Case Studies of Family Influence on Treatment Outcome After Stroke
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Don Freed
    California State University, Fresno, CA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
Two Case Studies of Family Influence on Treatment Outcome After Stroke
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 16-19. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.4.16
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 16-19. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.4.16
The influence of family on rehabilitation has long been recognized. Nearly all the major textbooks of neurogenic communication disorders comment on the positive effect a supportive family can have on the final outcome of rehabilitation (Brookshire, 2003; Duffy, 1995; Johnson & Jacobson, 1998; Myers, 1999; Tompkins, 1995). For example, Brookshire stated that families can facilitate the generalization of treatment to other settings by acting as surrogate clinicians at home, creating unique situations where the patient must use skills learned in treatment, and assessing the individual’s performance outside of clinic. This paper presents case studies of two adults with acquired neurogenic communication disorders and how their families influenced the final outcome of treatment. In both cases, the individuals’ families played very significant roles in the recovery process, mostly by doing the types of tasks described by Brookshire. In addition, the second case study reveals what can happen whenfamily involvement is essentially removed from the rehabilitation effort.
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