Communication Strategies for Children With ABI and Their Parents Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the leading cause of death and disability in adolescents (Centers for Disease Control, 2004). ABI is a general term referring to damage to the brain that includes both traumatic and nontraumatic injuries, excluding congenital and degenerative brain injuries (Blosser & DePompei, 1994). As children with ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
Communication Strategies for Children With ABI and Their Parents
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen Busse
    East Shore Special Educational Regional Resource Center, Cleveland, OH
  • Lyn Turkstra
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
Communication Strategies for Children With ABI and Their Parents
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 10-16. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.4.10
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2004, Vol. 14, 10-16. doi:10.1044/nnsld14.4.10
Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the leading cause of death and disability in adolescents (Centers for Disease Control, 2004). ABI is a general term referring to damage to the brain that includes both traumatic and nontraumatic injuries, excluding congenital and degenerative brain injuries (Blosser & DePompei, 1994). As children with brain injuries mature, communication deficits tend to be less obvious than physical or motor deficits; however, they have the potential to become increasingly detrimental to a child’s social and academic development (DePompei, Zarski, Hall, 1988; Feeney & Ylvisaker, 1995; Montgomery, 1992). Moderate to severe injury in young children may interfere with later developing skills or rapidly developing skills (e.g., problem solving, memory, and abstract reasoning) putting young children at risk for poor long-term recovery (Chapman & McKinnon, 2000; Dennis, 1996; Donders & Strom, 2000). As a result, it is premature to label children who are still developing as “fully recovered/7 given the possibility that disability will increase over time (Chapman & McKinnon; Feeney & Ylvisaker; Montgomery).
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