Pick of the Lit This column by the Division 2 Clinical Issues Committee is designed to highlight clinically relevant journal articles. This edition’s selections run the gamut from a nuts-and-bolts examination of whether a seventh day of treatment is truly cost-effective, to a review of imaging studies that explore the neuroanatomy of cognitive functions. ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2001
Pick of the Lit
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Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2001
Pick of the Lit
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2001, Vol. 11, 39-40. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.3.39
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2001, Vol. 11, 39-40. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.3.39
This column by the Division 2 Clinical Issues Committee is designed to highlight clinically relevant journal articles. This edition’s selections run the gamut from a nuts-and-bolts examination of whether a seventh day of treatment is truly cost-effective, to a review of imaging studies that explore the neuroanatomy of cognitive functions.
Ruff, R. M., Yarnell, S., & Marinos, J. M. (1999). Are stroke patients discharged sooner if in-patient rehabilitation services are provided seven v six days per week? American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 78, 143–146.
As its title implies, this article examines a question that is being raised at many facilities as they seek ways to reduce patient lengths of stay (LOS) in order to contain costs. The authors compared the treatment outcomes of 113 consecutively-admitted CVA patients who were divided into two groups: one that received a 6-day-per-week treatment program and one that received a 7-day-per-week treatment program. The treatment programs consisted of occupational, physical, and speech therapy. The authors compared the overall LOS (omitting patients whose LOS was affected by nontherapeutic factors) and change in Functional Independence Measures for dressing, bladder control, ambulation, and problem solving, which were judged as most likely to influence discharge, for the two groups. They reported that neither the LOS nor the functional outcomes were better for the 7-day-per-week treatment group. Thus, in their institution, the 7-day treatment program actually increased the costs of providing treatment without improving outcomes. This study might provide useful data for clinicians whose employers are contemplating the move to a 7-day-per-week treatment program.
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